The reporting tools are a real benefit, it’s good to be able to see response rates and monitor who is, or isn’t, opening our campaigns, and what interests our readers, what they might be sharing. We are also able to include images, which we couldn’t previously do in Outlook, and share items directly via our social media
Derek Williamson
Museum Manager
Various images of the Museum of Human Diseases' email templates

Visitors to the Museum of Human Disease may come face to face with real killers – but hopefully the only Third Eye visitors will see is the one adding functionality to the Museum’s electronic communication!

The Museum, at the School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, is Australia’s only publicly accessible Medical Pathology collection, with examples of all of Australia's leading causes of death.  

“Visitors can see tobacco's wall of shame, be captivated by a tumour with hair and teeth, be amazed at what the body can survive, stunned by the choices we make and inspired by the world that exists right inside you,” says Museum Manager Derek Williamson.

Derek is interested in improving the way the Museum communicates to the several thousand subscribers on its database. 

“I wanted to explore the potential of a more sophisticated email campaign tool to replace the limited Outlook lists we were using,” he says.

When the Museum began trialling ThirdEye in mid-2012 it had categorised its subscribers into three distinct groups: 

  1. A major list (1400+) of high school teachers, mainly biology and sciences, who coordinate school excursions to the Museum, and Career Advisors needing information for subject choices
  2. 200 active volunteers - mainly UNSW students – who help with on-site visits
  3. Individuals (300+) with specific interests (professional/academic) in the Museum’s collections and in supporting its continued existence.

“Our main objectives with email communication is to promote the value of site visits to schools and encourage their advance bookings, advise of upcoming special events (e.g. for Professional Development events), and to provide volunteers with bookings schedules and dates when we need staff,” Derek says. 

Derek says the added functionality of Third Eye provided ready benefits, and that the system has been relatively easy to use.

Third Eye has a sophisticated by reporting functionality which can help users understand the content different subscribers find relevant to them.

“The reporting tools are a real benefit, it’s good to be able to see response rates and monitor who is, or isn’t, opening our campaigns, and what interests our readers, what they might be sharing.  We are also able to include images, which we couldn’t previously do in Outlook, and share items directly via our social media”, he says. 

The Museum still provides pdfs for excursion bookings to help schools with internal approval processes, but wants to move away from paper-based tools and is eager to explore further enhancements to its communication via other Third Eye features.